INTERESTING URLs, to scientific papers

Focus on what interests you!

Although my main “thing” is hormones, I have to admit that other “things” exist.
In truth, although hormone balance seems supremely important to me, you folk may well consider it secondary, or even way down the “important” list!

My blog is designed to provide an ongoing commentary on scientific advances in hormone therapy, to keep my readers up-to-date.
But the blog, by virtue of its unorganised nature, can only provide a temporary, passing uptick in your level of interest: lots of important stuff will soon be buried in the jumble of disconnected OOH!s and AHH!s.

So it came to mind that it might be a better idea to offer a list of titles and their URLs, which would lead you to focus on what interests you – a list from which something really stimulating, which you hadn’t thought of, might leap into your consciousness and really make a difference in your life.

The headlines are mine: Don’t take them seriously – I’m just trying to catch your eye !
I will start my list with one which is to me, entirely fresh and new:

0: Plants Feel Pain and Might Even See
https://nautil.us/issue/104/harmony/plants-feel-pain-and-might-even-see?utm_source=pocket-newtab

1: DEATH FROM SUDDEN MENOPAUSE ??
American Journal of Public Health (ajph)September 2013
The Mortality Toll of Estrogen Avoidance: An Analysis of Excess Deaths Among Hysterectomized Women Aged 50 to 59 Years …. Women NOT taking HRT:
https://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/full/10.2105/AJPH.2013.301295

2: POOR FUNCTION OF THYROID HORMONE IN COVID19 INFECTION

Logo of frontendo

A] Euthyroid Sick Syndrome (Functional Hypothyroidism) in Patients With COVID-19 Runmei Zou,1,†Chenfang Wu,2,†Siye Zhang,2Guyi Wang,2Quan Zhang,3Bo Yu,2Ying Wu,2Haiyun Dong,2Guobao Wu,2Shangjie Wu,4 and Yanjun Zhong2,*
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7575767/ Published online 2020 Oct 7. doi: 10.3389/fendo.2020.566439PMCID: PMC7575767PMID: 33117282
B] Cardiomyocyte-specific inactivation of thyroid hormone in pathologic ventricular hypertrophy: an adaptative response or part of the problem? By Christine J. Pol, Alice Muller, and Warner S. Simonides, In “Heart Failure Reviews”, Published online 2008 Dec 24. PMCID: PMC2820687 PMID: 19107595 doi: 10.1007/s10741-008-9133-7 Published online 2008 Dec 24.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2820687/https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2820687/

3: THE BEST SCIENCE FICTION BOOK BY A MEDICAL DOC, THIS CENTURY !!

4: THE BEST BOOK CHAPTER ABOUT DHEA ……… AND IT’S FREE (AS A PDF). https://www.intechopen.com/chapters/58381 Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA Sulfate: Roles in Brain Function and Disease: DOI:10.5772/intechopen.71141 In book: Sex Hormones in Neurodegenerative Processes and Diseases (2018). Authors: Tracey A. Quinn Stephen R Robinson and David William Walker researchgate.net/institution/RMIT-University (opens in a new tab)

5: THE BEST BLOG ABOUT AUTISM that I have seen (admittedly, I haven’t seen a lot). : Autism – Epidemic or Explosion? (And Why It Matters), by James Coplan MD https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/making-sense-autistic-spectrum-disorders/201607/autism-epidemic-or-explosion-and-why-it-matters

6: ARTIFICIAL SWEETENERS hurt the ability of gut bacteria to keep us well: Israeli study https://www.timesofisrael.com/sweeteners-hurt-the-ability-of-gut-bacteria-to-keep-us-well-israeli-study/

7: ALLOPREGNANOLONE, THE NEUROMODULATOR TURNED THERAPEUTIC AGENT:
by Graziano Pinna*Department of Psychiatry, The Psychiatric Institute, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States. Front. Endocrinol., 14 May 2020 |
https://doi.org/10.3389/fendo.2020.00236
https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fendo.2020.00236/full

8: Hypothyroidism-induced reversible dilated cardiomyopathy:
P Rastogi, A Dua, S Attri, and H Sharma, J Postgrad Med. 2018 Jul-Sep; 64(3): 177–179. doi: 10.4103/jpgm.JPGM_154_17PMCID: PMC6066629PMID: 29992912
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6066629/
This reports on a young female with DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY CAUSED BY HYPOTHYROIDISM
The cardiomyopathy was cured with T4.
Interestingly, the authors state ” The heart relies mainly on triiodothyronine (T3) because there is no significant deiodinase activity inside myocytes, and T3 is directly transported into the myocyte. During adult life, T3 modulates inotropic and lusitropic properties of the myocardium, myocardial contractility, and vascular function. T3 upregulates the transcription of many structural and functional proteins of the heart, namely, sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase, alpha-myosin heavy chain, beta-1 adrenergic receptors, Na/K ATPase, voltage-gated potassium channels, and atrial and brain natriuretic peptides. It also downregulates some genes such as beta-myosin heavy chain, phospholamban Na/Ca exchanger, transcription-associated protein 1 (TRa1), and adenylyl cyclase type 5 and 6. Nongenomic effects of thyroid hormone on the heart relate to changes in ion transport, glucose and amino acid transport, and a number of intracellular signaling pathways.[4,5] Hypothyroidism can produce clinical phenotype of heart failure from a number of diverse mechanisms which include: bradycardia, impaired contractility, impaired diastolic filling, increased systemic vascular resistance, diastolic hypertension, and endothelial dysfunction.[6] It has also been demonstrated that subclinical hypothyroidism may lead to the development of heart failure. Studies have shown that like the sick-euthyroid syndrome occurring in various nonthyroidal illnesses, for example, sepsis, patients with heart failure who have normal thyroid gland may have low circulating levels of T3 with normal levels of T4 and TSH. Low serum T3 in these patients strongly predicts all-cause and cardiovascular mortality.[7]
The most consistent cardiac abnormality recognized in patients with overt hypothyroidism is impairment of LV diastolic function characterized by slowed myocardial relaxation and impaired early ventricular filling.”………………….

In spite of these observations, the patient was treated with T4 instead of T3, which would have corrected the problem quickly.
Fortunately, the patient recovered in spite of the T4, probably due to stress reduction engendered by feeling safer in her hospital bed.

9: Growth Hormone in Aging ……. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK279163/, Jose M Garcia, MD, PhD, George R Merriam, MD, and Atil Y Kargi, MD. Last Update: October 7, 2019.
This is a very complicated subject: I will write a blog about Growth Hormone, later.

10: Alterations of host-gut microbiome interactions in multiple sclerosis, by laudia Cantoni1 et al. Published in “eBioMedicine” (The Lancet),Jan 27, 2022 DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ebiom.2021.103798, https://www.thelancet.com/journals/ebiom/article/PIIS2352-3964(21)00592-2/fulltext
This is an amazingly detailed, obsessively conscientious and altogether admirable article. Don’t try to read it: it’s too complicated.
Anyway, it infers that it would be a good idea for MS-affected folks to reduce meat consumption, but it doesn’t provide a clear recommendation of meat avoidance by MS sufferers.
Also, they linked meat to decreased gut microbe B.thetaiotaomicron, but did not make any suggestions re. probiotics.
The authors imply however, that they will follow this study with further work ……. they are worth following.

11: Cardiomyocyte-specific inactivation of thyroid hormone in pathologic ventricular hypertrophy: an adaptative response or part of the problem? By Christine J. Pol, Alice Muller, and Warner S. Simonides, In “Heart Failure Reviews”, Published online 2008 Dec 24. PMCID: PMC2820687 PMID: 19107595 doi: 10.1007/s10741-008-9133-7 Published online 2008 Dec 24.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2820687/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2820687/

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